Tips For Using Writing For Self-Healing

By Guest Writer Chloe M. Bennet,

Just like the old suggestion that, if you are ever feeling angry about a situation, you write a letter and then throw it away, writing can be an incredibly therapeutic tool. Expressing yourself on paper has a range of benefits, including allowing you to organize your thoughts on a topic, potentially allowing you to spot solutions, expressing something you’ve never been able to tell anyone, the list goes on. The important thing to recognize is that it certainly can’t do you any harm, and there’s a good chance that devoting a bit of time to using writing to heal some of your mental wounds will make you a whole lot happier.

Develop A Schedule

The deeper the trauma or injury that you’re dealing with mentally is, the longer it will take to heal. In most cases, aside perhaps from the above scenario of writing to express singular anger, you will need to write across a period of time, potentially days, maybe months, to unpack whatever it is you are dealing with. “One thing I always recommend is trying to develop a habit of your writing, building it into your schedule in a way that acts almost like daily medication to fight a long term illness”, says Martha Kim, health writer at BoomEssays and Sociology Essays. It may seem daunting at first but, once you get going, you should find that it becomes something you look forward to, a chance to deal with anything weighing on your mind through an average day.

Ignore Formalities

You don’t need to have headings, or dates (though you might choose to), you don’t even need to have good spelling or grammar. The point is to just write. Often, writing stream of consciousness style can actually be the most therapeutic method, since there’s no barrier between the thoughts in your head and the page before you. Whatever you end up doing, don’t wait on formalities. In all likelihood no-one will ever read what you are writing so just let it flow and concentrate more on delivering truth and arriving at healing than at making sure your punctuation is all in order.

Notice The Change

Sometimes change can be so gradual over time that you don’t even notice it happening. And then one day you just think to yourself that you feel a lot better. This is great but connecting the change to the writing can help you identify what aspect to the writing, or what topics are making the difference in your journey towards reaching a happier, healthier mindset. This can be tough but, combined with daily written check-ins, you ought to be able to see how your mindset is evolving over time.

Be Patient

You can’t expect to get results from this instantly. “For some people, they sit down, write one page and suddenly their mind is able to see clearly where their sadness or anxiety is coming from and how they can go about solving that problem. For most it will take significantly longer than one session. For a few it could take years”, notes Helena Parker, lifestyle blogger at Nursing Essay Writing and Academized. Patience means not expecting results. Not expecting results is actually far more likely to make for a result which actually helps you, since you take the pressure off the writing and it becomes about self-expression, not a means to an ends.

Force Yourself To Write, No Matter Your Mood

It can be easy to think to yourself that, since you’re particularly annoyed about something, or stressed or bored or whatever it might be, you can’t really bring yourself to write. This is the wrong attitude. The point of the writing is to express yourself no matter how you feel. Even if you feel in a great mood, that ought to be chronicled and put down on paper to really give yourself the most complete picture of your mindset that you possibly can.

Conclusion

Overall, writing can be a wonderfully therapeutic thing to do and can, with determination, be used to heal all sorts of wounds. It takes work though, and you’ll need to commit to it. Hopefully, some of these tips will help you to get into the right mindset to find success.

 

About the author:

Chloe Bennet is a health writer at Paper Fellows and Assignment Service. She writes about yoga, meditation and self-help. Also, Chloe teaches editing and grammar at OX Essays portal.

 

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